Physical Activity vs. Exercise

When I first started writing this blog, it was meant to describe a shift that has occurred in my career and life.  I have been a personal trainer and strength and conditioning coach for 15 years and have run a business for 12 years.  Last year I took a step back from in-person training to work abroad, consult for other companies, and run my business.  And then…a pandemic hit.  Now many of the SVPT trainers and clients are dealing with the exact same issue – going from being active all day to finding it difficult to get off the couch.

Before the pandemic, I would still see clients 3 days a week for a few hours when I was in town.  (I think it’s important to keep my tools sharp, be around my team, keep learning, and be IN the industry in the trenches.)  Despite that, I quickly noticed that I moved from being active all day on the gym floor to mostly working at a desk.  I have become the person we see all the time at the gym – the desk worker!  Now that the gym is temporarily closed due to COVID-19, my level of movement is even lower than before, and I am sure EVERYONE is dealing with an overall loss of movement and exercise because of fitness facility closures.

As a trainer I have always understood how bad sitting at a desk was for the body, but now I am LIVING it.   Even though I do more sitting now than ever, I still train 4-6 days a week. However, what I have now realized more than is that formal gym-based exercise is not enough on its own – it must be supplemented with simple ACTIVITY.

Currently many of us are stuck in our houses, either working from home at a makeshift desk, or homeschooling kids, or simply unable to work…and making good use of the Netflix subscription.  Life has simply changed, and for many people it hasn’t been for the better. Exercise and physical activity have become even harder to fit in, and motivation is at an all-time low.

The biggest eye opener for me was when I looked at my phone one day and saw how many steps I took over the week. I was mortified.  I exercised 1 hour a day, sat for 8-10 hours, and got in 1500 steps a day?  Our bodies simply are not designed for that.

(Disclaimer:  Yes, steps are not the only indicator of activity, but since I have my phone on me most of the time, it is a great measurement for ME of activity levels.  Sometimes measurement is necessary to shed light, even if it doesn’t necessarily show the whole picture.)

The realization was – the less movement you have in your daily life, the more you need to do to be fit and healthy (physically and mentally).  For example, if your day job is sitting for 8 hours, you need to fit in structured exercise AND general movement. The formal gym exercise is to work on specific qualities like strength or mobility, and the general activity spread throughout the day is to keep the body vital, energized, loose, and healthy. When we are sedentary, we stagnate and stiffen up. When we move, we have life and energy and actually feel human!

For those who have a job that keeps them moving all day – think construction laborers, childcare workers, retail associates – formal, gym-based exercise can take a more central role and be more targeted to specific goals. These folks are already getting plenty of unstructured physical activity throughout the day! For those in a more sedentary job, perhaps informal activity should be the main focus with structured exercise as the supplementary piece.

Confused yet?  Thought getting to the gym and working out was enough?  Don’t get me wrong…of course the exercise you are doing is GREAT!  But we also need activity outside of structured exercise.  And that doesn’t have to be complicated – it can be as simple as walking.

Let’s break down the difference.  Both exercise and general movement improve health, and both have benefits for the body and mind.  But the term “physical activity” should not be confused with “exercise”, which is a subcategory of physical activity.

What is exercise?

Exercise is any intentional bodily activity that enhances or maintains physical fitness and overall health and wellness. Exercise is targeted and specific to goals, and it has particular physiological effects. It is planned, structured, repetitive, and aims to improve or maintain one or more components of physical fitness.

What is physical activity?

Physical activity simply means movement of the body that uses energy, or BEING ACTIVE. Walking, household chores, gardening, pushing a baby stroller, climbing the stairs, recreational sports, or dancing the night away are all good examples of being active. Beyond exercise, any other physical activity that is done during leisure time, for transport to get to and from places, or as part of a person’s work, has a health benefit.

We as a population generally engage in very little physical activity.  We may exercise, but we aren’t as ACTIVE.  We exercise, then Netflix.  We exercise, then sit at a desk all day.  We exercise, then park as close as we can to where we are going, we drive everywhere, we take advantage of the EASY in life.  The phrase “active couch potatoes” has emerged to describe those of us who do structured exercise 30-60 minutes per day, yet remain sedentary the rest of the day. And let’s face it, we just don’t engage in the amount of movement that we did 50 years ago due to advances in technology (and sometimes just plain laziness!).

So what do you do?  Be more active or exercise more?   It depends.  If you exercise for an hour a day, add more activity.  If you are active all day, add some structured exercise to improve physical fitness.

For myself, I have set a personal goal of either taking a minimum of 10,000 steps per day OR engaging in some type of activity outside of structured exercise – a walk, a bike ride, or recreational sports. This is in addition to my scheduled exercise program 4-6 days per week. Now, this isn’t a strict plan. I know life will happen and some days I will not get in my activity, but at least I am now more aware of it.  When you know better, you do better.

So how can you be more ACTIVE in a day?  Well, it’s simple – move more, sit less.  Engage in life more

Park far away, or walk to the store
Take a walk in nature, or simply around the block
Play a game outside with your kid(s)
Join a recreation league sports team
Find a friend that wants to try new activities with you
Take the stairs every chance you get
Make lunch hour about movement
Plant a garden and keep it alive
Organize your house
Help a neighbor or friend or family member organize theirs
Get a dog
Volunteer
Sign up for a charity walk
Offer to help a senior with things they need done around their house
Dance, or take a dance class
Learn a new skill or sport

*Of course, due to physical and social distancing many of these are not possible now, but in the future you can definitely add these in. 

During this pandemic, there are many ways you can add activity into your day while you isolate, and you can do it with the people you are isolating alongside:

Take a 30-60 minute walk – away from everyone else – every day

(The benefits of simple walking have been proven over and over again)

Games with the kids

Clear some furniture and find a game that gets you moving
Get outside for games in the yard

Stairs – if you have stairs in your home, make the effort to go up and down them more than you usually do

Gardening and/or yard work (weather permitting)
Maybe it’s time to take down those Christmas decorations, clean up the yard, or plant the garden you have always wanted

Organize

Home Improvement
That room or basement that you have always wanted to organize or paint…….or the basement…..now is the time

Spring Clean
Go deep.

Personally, since adding in more activity, I simply feel better – physically and mentally.  I feel like I did when I was on my feet training people for 10 hours a day.  Also, t my daily COVID-19 physical distance walks and gym spring cleaning activity has been a huge help in managing stress.

Finally, during these stressful times………do what you can.  Do what feels good to you at the time.  Exercise and physical activity shouldn’t ADD stress, it should relieve it. Right now everyone is in survival mode and stress is high, and sometimes surviving doesn’t include squats. Sometimes it’s just a nice walk, scrubbing the shower or reading a book.

Stay healthy!

Shara Vigeant, BA, NSCA-CPT*D, CFSC

Owner, SVPT Fitness & Athletics

Running from COVID-19: Beginners Guide to Running

The closure of public and private gyms and recreation facilities has created a “running boom” since it’s one of the easiest ways to get in some exercise under the new social and physical distancing protocols. You might think there’s really nothing to it; just lace up your kicks, switch on the iPod and go, right? WRONG.

If your goal is to actually take up running as a hobby, then do yourself a favour and don’t simply hit the pavement and run until you want to puke, or your legs give out. Sure, you totally could go do this, but your risk for injury would be high and would not likely lead you to a sustainable or enjoyable running routine. Seeing as we’ll be in this self-isolation situation for the unforeseeable future, you might as well do this the right way and actually make productive use of your newfound free time.

The real first step you need to take is to actually get fit before you run. Yes, you read that right. Before you run, you need to make sure your body is able to handle the impact of running. If you have been exercising regularly, doing your strength and mobility work and are injury free, then awesome, you should be good to go.

If you haven’t been consistent with strength work or exercise, or haven’t exercised ever, we wouldn’t recommend hitting the pavement before your body is actually in any physical shape to handle running. Running takes strength to push off and absorb the impact as you land, and if you don’t know how to control your body you are dramatically increasing your risk of injury.

Check out our blog on Strength Training for Runners to help you get strong before starting a running routine.

Once the body is ready for the impact of running the next step would be to invest in a decent pair of running shoes. Seriously. For the love of all that is Holy, DO NOT dust off those sneakers you’ve had sitting in your closet for the past decade. You don’t need top of the line, but a new pair of running shoes (not trainers or casual shoes) will make all the difference in how your body takes to your new pavement pounding hobby.

Okay, now that you’ve got your fresh and supportive kicks, and a strong and healthy body, it’s time to get outside. We have included a 6 Week Beginner Run Program at the end of this blog, but first please review these important tips.

Warm Up. Seriously.
“Serious runners” might scoff at you warming up by doing anything other than just running at a slower pace than normal, but that doesn’t mean you should skip your warm up too. Especially now, where most of the day is undoubtedly spent between the couch and an uncomfortable office chair, warming your body up is important.

Start Slow
If you want to enjoy more that the first 30 seconds of your run, take it out slow. Slower than you think you need to. If you’re new to exercise, you’ll learn quickly that you’ve got the most energy at the beginning and that fresh feeling fades through your workout. Those who are familiar with strength training can draw an analogy to energy levels during a lifting session. If you don’t want to burn out too quickly, take it easy in the beginning.

Start with Walk/Run Intervals
Sure, you could go out and run 30 minutes straight, but tomorrow walking might be an issue and long term that’s not sustainable. Start with 3-5 minutes run, 1 minute walk and increase your running time every other time you run. If your form breaks down, take a break and let your body recover by walking. If you lose your form doing squats usually you’d stop right? Running is no different; quality is always better than quantity.

Remember: It Will Get Easier
Whether you’re a seasoned gym-goer or new to exercise altogether, a new activity is always tough in the beginning. Hang in there. Before you know it, your runs will feel easier, your form will make it feel smoother, and you might even find you’re enjoying yourself on your run.

Practice Post-Run Self-Care
Be sure to give your muscles some TLC after exercising. Foam roll, stretch, and if you’re feeling fancy, treat yourself to a relaxing Epsom salt bath – you earned it!

PLEASE REMEMBER – when you are out there running, PLEASE adhere to the physical distancing protocols from health officials during this pandemic. We are in this together, so if you each give 3 feet, you will be 6 feet apart. Stay Healthy!

6 Week Beginner Run Program

Week 1:
2-3 runs 20 -30 minutes total – run 3-5 mins, walk 1 min

Week 2:
2-3 runs 25 – 35 minutes total – run 4-6 mins, walk 1 min

Week 3:
2-4 runs 30 – 40 minutes total – run 5-7 mins, walk 1 min

Week 4:
2-4 runs 30 – 40 minutes total – run 6-8 mins, walk 1 min

Week 5:
2-5 runs 35 – 4 5minutes total – run 7-9 mins, walk 1 min

Week 6:
2-5 runs 35 – 45 minutes total – run 8-10 mins, walk 1 min

*Keep in mind that the Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines suggest AT LEAST 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous intensity aerobic physical activity per week. This translates to 30 minutes 5 days per week to meet the minimum 150 minutes.

Temporarily Closed

With the latest developments on COVID-19, we have decided to temporarily suspend operations, effective 6:00 pm, March 16, 2020. We will reassess the situation on a week-to-week basis.

As our clients know, we have been taking this very seriously and being diligent in our safe operations of business, and following all protocols outlined by health officials.

We care about your health and safety, therefore this decision is the best for everyone. We must protect not only ourselves, but others.

All sessions, and class passes will be put on hold. Please contact your SVPT trainer directly to discuss distance/online training, and home programs.

PLEASE keep your health a priority during these times and continue with your fitness, as its essential for self-care and immune health.

Contact us directly with any questions or concerns.

Recovery and Self-Care

The topics of recovery and self-care are pretty hot in the fitness industry. These topics have some strong merit and are worth discussing, especially given how confusing social media and the internet can be when it comes to deciding your recovery and self-care methods. We would like to simplify it.

For the purposes of this blog, we will consider “recovery” to be about the physical side of health and “self-care” to be about the mental and emotional side. While separate in some senses, there is strong overlap between the two and they are often closely intertwined.

First thing – you can only train as hard as you can recover. Read that again. Then read one more time. If you want to continue crushing your goals and making progress, your recovery must be equally as focused. You can’t keep training at a full gas tank level of intensity when the gas tank is only a quarter full. For every penny you withdraw from the bank for training, you need to make an equal or greater deposit for recovery.

Recovery is different for everyone. It can also be different from year to year, month to month, and sometimes even week to week. Your recovery will go through natural fluctuations along with your activity levels, fitness levels, and lifestyle. The way you recovered from training last year might be dramatically different this year. Maybe you changed jobs, opened a business, got divorced, changed fitness goals, changed type of physical activity, had a child, got injured….all while getting another year older. Age and lifestyle will dramatically affect how you recover from activity as well as the time it takes to recover. Embrace the change that will happen when it comes to choosing recovery methods. Be okay with being different than before.

Recovery methods can take many forms: a full day off, massage, yoga, stretching, sauna, ice bath, hot tub, cardiovascular work, naps, low intensity movement (active recovery), quality sleep, or mobility sessions. While there is conflicting science out there about what works best for recovery, the BEST recovery method is one that you can access easily (for consistency) and that, you know……actually helps you feel recovered! Recovery should have you feeling GOOD and ready to train again.

This year, or even this month, your recovery might be more focused on managing the stress of life rather than managing the stress of exercise. That is where self-care can come in and have a lot of benefit. Self-care can help you recover physically as well, since taking care of your mental and emotional health will help you train at a higher level and with greater longevity. Sometimes we are mentally exhausted, even on a full physical gas tank. When this happens, taking time to ‘reset’ mentally or check out of life is very needed.

Some of the most popular forms of self-care are: disconnecting from technology, coffee with a friend, Netflix and chill, therapy, walking the dog, walking in nature, yoga, bath and a book, quiet time with a book, day at the spa, time away, and quality sleep.

At the end of the day – simplify and choose a recovery and/or self-care method that works for you and that you can stick to. Because like all things in life and exercise, CONSISTENCY IS KEY.

What matters is that you feel recovered, regenerated, and rejuvenated from your recovery and self-care routine, regardless of what method you use.

Shara Vigeant, BA, NSCA-CPT*D, CFSC

Glen & Jocelyne’s #MYFIT Story

2018

2020

SVPT is proud to present #MYFIT – a celebration of our clients who live a fit and balanced lifestyle.
**
#MYFIT is not about a 6 pack or a bikini body, it’s about showing that fitness comes in ALL SHAPES AND SIZES, and truly is training to live a more full life. It’s not about young and skinny, it’s about showing that fitness can be a part of ANYONE’S life, regardless of age.
**
#MYFIT celebrates clients who challenge themselves physically and mentally to move better, perform better and live better. #thesvptway
**
We are grateful to clients, Glen and Jocelyne, for sharing their #MYFIT story, again, after first sharing it with us in 2018 (yup, they are still with us!):

Glen and Jocelyn are sharing their #MYFIT story through a poem:

ODE TO SVPT

Our Retirement was pending

But the energy was ending

One look in the mirror

Had left us in fear

With bodies obese

And more than 1 crease

We were sick and tired

So..a trainer was hired

We joined SVPT

To create a new me

What a place we found ourselves in

Let the exercise now begin

A start was made and it was slow

We felt embarrassed and on show

Commitment was the #1 key

To the success of this new journey

Improvement did not come with ease

The option to quit was always a tease

But three times a week we went without fail

Three years went by and we did prevail

Four trainers we did outlast

Brittany is the most steadfast

Lifting, flexing, lunging….we began to move

But the weight we simply could not lose

Training alone was not enough

Diet too made the right stuff

 

A full lifestyle shift is what was needed

And with our tenacity it was completed

Together 170 lbs we did drop

Simply because we did not stop

Another look into the mirror

No longer brings that same old fear

 

Italy, Austria, Croatia and more

Off to challenge ourselves galore

A thousand kilometers we did ride

And taller mountains we could stride

Injury, illness, surgery, depression

Tried to derail us but taught us a lesson

 

The motto upon which we relied

And to our success it did provide

That everyday No matter what

It’s really simple;  “JUST SHOW UP

Now we feel our future’s secure

Because we know we can endure

 

Biking Pilgrim’s Trail in Spain awaits

Without guides and carrying our freight

We cannot afford to be lazy

Instead we need to train like crazy

Can’t thank you enough SVPT

In helping dreams become reality

 

Aislinn’s #MYFIT STORY

SVPT is proud to present #MYFIT – a celebration of our clients who live a fit and balanced lifestyle.
**
#MYFIT is not about a 6 pack or a bikini body, it’s about showing that fitness comes in ALL SHAPES AND SIZES, and truly is training to live a more full life. It’s not about young and skinny, it’s about showing that fitness can be a part of ANYONE’S life, regardless of age.
**
#MYFIT celebrates clients who challenge themselves physically and mentally to move better, perform better and live better. #thesvptway
**
We are grateful to client, Aislinn, for sharing her #MYFIT story:

“I’ve really just started my fitness journey. For most of my life, I’ve been somewhat inactive, but I figured we have a finite amount of time on this earth and it would be a shame to die without knowing what my body is capable of. I can’t say I look forward to working out, but I challenge myself to do it anyway to achieve my goals. I want to feel strong—prepared for life’s challenges and capable of handling daily tasks (e.g. carrying Costco groceries, rearranging my furniture, cradling my great dane like a baby, etc.). After each session, I feel more energized (funny how that works) and proud of what I’ve accomplished. It may be relatively small, but it’s a big deal to me.”

It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year?

Hustle and bustle! That’s usually what comes to mind with the holiday season and family obligations, work parties, and other social gatherings. This usually means less free time and lots of (tasty) foods and drinks. Maybe this is what sparks the desire in most people to start up a new exercise program in the New Year as a result of guilty feelings towards a month of poor eating and neglecting your healthy routines. Many gyms thrive on the unrealistic goals of the “resolutionists”, but the best ones remain steady throughout the year because they teach balance and not using shame to make you feel like you need to “exercise away” the holiday weight gain.

The #SVPTway isn’t about shame or guilt surrounding the holidays. True LONG TERM success is about recognizing the ebbs and flows of life and not feeling bad when you have less time to give to your healthy habits. The holidays are a time for maintenance, not for making gains in fitness. But hey, if you are making gains then keep it up. We are just saying that maintenance is AWESOME during this time of year. Just keep moving and get some exercise in where you can. Be attentive to what you’re putting in your body, but life is short (READ: eat the damn cake). While the New Year might inspire you to get back into routine and maybe work a bit harder, remember that getting back into things means that you’re going to need to ease in to avoid a burnout. Remember that setting sustainable goals will help you stick to your new routine. Hiring a certified, qualified trainer can help you learn how to set attainable goals and stay motivated as well as keep you accountable which usually means sticking to the plan for longer.

Tips for December training:
● Try to get in exercise where you can – not only will this help you keep your gains, but also relieve holiday stress, and give you a moment of YOU time
● Don’t be afraid to change it up if travel and time means you can’t do what you normally do – opt for outdoor activities, a new class, etc. – something is better than nothing
● Try to incorporate movement into family activities when you can – get everyone moving

Tips for January training:
● Ease into it – don’t go all out in the beginning
● Create SMART goals that are attainable and sustainable – just because its January 1st, doesn’t mean your life has miraculously changed and all of a sudden you can do more than what you could in 2019
● Stay away from trends and challenges
● Hire a trainer to keep you accountable and teach you how to be independent, after all, you don’t want to be making the SAME goals next year. Next year you should be hitting NEW ones!

BMI: Is it Important?

BMI, or body mass index, is a calculation based on the height and weight of a person that is supposed to be a general measure of overall health and body composition. For many years this was the standard to determine whether a person was within an acceptable weight range for their height to deem them “healthy”, overweight or obese.

Over the past few years, there has been many speaking out against the use of this measure within the health and fitness industry. This is because the calculation does not take into account any factors other than height and weight. It is an inaccurate measure of body fat content and does not take into account factors like muscle mass, bone density, overall body composition, racial and differences between sexes.

Traditionally BMI has been used as a tool to predict the risk of disease and mortality by measuring a correlation between obesity and things like heart disease, stroke, heart failure and diabetes. However, there have been a number of studies that have indicated that some people considered “obese” on the BMI scale, in fact, have a lower cardiovascular risk and an improved metabolic profile compared to some individuals with a “normal BMI” who are more metabolically unhealthy and at a higher risk for disease than their obese counterparts.

It doesn’t take a scientist to understand why BMI might not give an accurate or useful body composition profile. Consider an athlete, someone who competes as either a bodybuilder or something like an MMA fighter. These athletes are not only muscular, but typically quite lean. Not to mention their fitness levels are often well above the average Joe. Someone with this body type who is 5’10” and 190 lbs would have a BMI of 27.3. This BMI would put this individual in the category of overweight, yet no one looking at this athlete would think that could be possible. The calculation wrongly assumes lower muscle mass and high relative fat content.

BMI also does not consider localized body fat, which is potentially more dangerous than overall fat as it relates to body composition. Abdominal fat has been found to have severe health risks including cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance and higher mortality rates. Additionally, thinner people might also have an excess of visceral fat, which is linked to higher risk of disease when compared to lean muscle mass.

Unfortunately, despite its obvious flaws in accurately capturing the overall fat content and health of an individual, BMI is sort of all we have. There are more efficient and accurate methods to measure body fat percentage, but these come with a hefty price tag that is simply not practical for most people. Measuring height and weight is convenient and practical during a quick doctor’s visit. Until there is a better method available, BMI will continue to be used by healthcare professionals, but it should come with a disclaimer that the results should be taken with a grain of salt.

Kristen Hansen, BA, CSEP-CPT, PFT-NAIT, NASM-CES, FRCms
SVPT Fitness & Athletics

Jackie’s #MYFIT STORY


SVPT is proud to present #MYFIT – a celebration of our clients who live a fit and balanced lifestyle.
**
#MYFIT is not about a 6 pack or a bikini body, it’s about showing that fitness comes in ALL SHAPES AND SIZES, and truly is training to live a more full life. It’s not about young and skinny, it’s about showing that fitness can be a part of ANYONE’S life, regardless of age.
**
#MYFIT celebrates clients who challenge themselves physically and mentally to move better, perform better and live better. #thesvptway
**
We are grateful to long time client, Jackie, for sharing her #MYFIT story:
“I have been going to a gym of some sorts since I was old enough to get a membership. And for many years I had my own home gym. While I remained committed to my workout routine, I never really saw results. A minor car accident 9 years ago led to a nagging back injury. Physio and massage helped provide relief in the short term, but I couldn’t get rid of the ache. Regular massage therapy became my crutch. One day I decided I needed to make a big change to the way I was doing things. I became an SVPT client 3 years ago.
SVPT trainer, Cam has taught me how to work out correctly and efficiently. I have surprised myself with how much weight I can now lift, push or carry. The progress I have seen with my endurance and strength has been empowering.
I know now what #MYFIT means to me.
It means focusing on my muscle and strength, not the weight on the scale. And making my back healthy, strong and pain-free.
It means moving freely, easily and without limitation.
It means setting a goal I never imagined I would set, doing something I didn’t think I could do….I completed the Melissa’s Road Race 5K in Banff this past September, setting my own personal best of 31min20sec.
It means not working out alone in a big box gym or in my basement; rather being part of a community of like-minded, supportive and fun people.
And it means turning 50 in a few months feeling the fittest I have ever been.”

Denyse's #MYFIT Story- Edmonton Fitness

Denyse’s #MYFIT STORY

SVPT is proud to present #MYFIT – a celebration of our clients who live a fit and balanced lifestyle.
**
#MYFIT is not about a 6 pack or a bikini body, it’s about showing that fitness comes in ALL SHAPES AND SIZES, and truly is training to live a more full life. It’s not about young and skinny, it’s about showing that fitness can be a part of ANYONE’S life, regardless of age.
**
#MYFIT celebrates clients who challenge themselves physically and mentally to move better, perform better and live better. #thesvptway
**
We are grateful to client, Denyse, for sharing her #MYFIT story:
“#MYFIT has been a journey of overcoming obstacles and redefining the way I think about my body and my identity. After sustaining several injuries from long-distance running, I began to look into alternative ways to maintain an active lifestyle. I soon realized I needed to go beyond “just running” to perform more optimally; a balanced approach of building strength, endurance, and better body mechanics would allow me to pursue the activities I loved and my goals of a healthy body without perennial injury.
There was one problem however- finding an approach for lifting weights wasn’t easy. I was born without much of my left hand in a condition known as symbrachydactyly. I knew how to use resistance machines but wanted to make the progressions that dumbbell and barbell exercises could afford me.
The journey to find prosthetics that could work for me in a way that was pain-free, and most of all safe, is one I’m still on. As in all things, I found being my own advocate, doing the research, and not taking bad solutions for an answer allowed me work through many sub-par prosthetics to find options that work for me. I’ve never let my limb difference define or limit me, but I now have the tools I need to do deadlifts, overhead presses, complex dumbbell movements—all exercises I’d once been unsure if I’d be able to figure out how to do.
Lately, #MYFIT has been about setting goals, achieving them, and showing myself what I’m capable of in the process. Everyone has challenges in pursuing their fitness goals—I encourage everyone to embrace those unique challenges, be brave enough to find solutions, and love themselves throughout the whole experience. You’re worth the time and effort of doing so.”