Temporarily Closed

With the latest developments on COVID-19, we have decided to temporarily suspend operations, effective 6:00 pm, March 16, 2020. We will reassess the situation on a week-to-week basis.

As our clients know, we have been taking this very seriously and being diligent in our safe operations of business, and following all protocols outlined by health officials.

We care about your health and safety, therefore this decision is the best for everyone. We must protect not only ourselves, but others.

All sessions, and class passes will be put on hold. Please contact your SVPT trainer directly to discuss distance/online training, and home programs.

PLEASE keep your health a priority during these times and continue with your fitness, as its essential for self-care and immune health.

Contact us directly with any questions or concerns.

Recovery and Self-Care

The topics of recovery and self-care are pretty hot in the fitness industry. These topics have some strong merit and are worth discussing, especially given how confusing social media and the internet can be when it comes to deciding your recovery and self-care methods. We would like to simplify it.

For the purposes of this blog, we will consider “recovery” to be about the physical side of health and “self-care” to be about the mental and emotional side. While separate in some senses, there is strong overlap between the two and they are often closely intertwined.

First thing – you can only train as hard as you can recover. Read that again. Then read one more time. If you want to continue crushing your goals and making progress, your recovery must be equally as focused. You can’t keep training at a full gas tank level of intensity when the gas tank is only a quarter full. For every penny you withdraw from the bank for training, you need to make an equal or greater deposit for recovery.

Recovery is different for everyone. It can also be different from year to year, month to month, and sometimes even week to week. Your recovery will go through natural fluctuations along with your activity levels, fitness levels, and lifestyle. The way you recovered from training last year might be dramatically different this year. Maybe you changed jobs, opened a business, got divorced, changed fitness goals, changed type of physical activity, had a child, got injured….all while getting another year older. Age and lifestyle will dramatically affect how you recover from activity as well as the time it takes to recover. Embrace the change that will happen when it comes to choosing recovery methods. Be okay with being different than before.

Recovery methods can take many forms: a full day off, massage, yoga, stretching, sauna, ice bath, hot tub, cardiovascular work, naps, low intensity movement (active recovery), quality sleep, or mobility sessions. While there is conflicting science out there about what works best for recovery, the BEST recovery method is one that you can access easily (for consistency) and that, you know……actually helps you feel recovered! Recovery should have you feeling GOOD and ready to train again.

This year, or even this month, your recovery might be more focused on managing the stress of life rather than managing the stress of exercise. That is where self-care can come in and have a lot of benefit. Self-care can help you recover physically as well, since taking care of your mental and emotional health will help you train at a higher level and with greater longevity. Sometimes we are mentally exhausted, even on a full physical gas tank. When this happens, taking time to ‘reset’ mentally or check out of life is very needed.

Some of the most popular forms of self-care are: disconnecting from technology, coffee with a friend, Netflix and chill, therapy, walking the dog, walking in nature, yoga, bath and a book, quiet time with a book, day at the spa, time away, and quality sleep.

At the end of the day – simplify and choose a recovery and/or self-care method that works for you and that you can stick to. Because like all things in life and exercise, CONSISTENCY IS KEY.

What matters is that you feel recovered, regenerated, and rejuvenated from your recovery and self-care routine, regardless of what method you use.

Shara Vigeant, BA, NSCA-CPT*D, CFSC

Glen & Jocelyne’s #MYFIT Story

2018

2020

SVPT is proud to present #MYFIT – a celebration of our clients who live a fit and balanced lifestyle.
**
#MYFIT is not about a 6 pack or a bikini body, it’s about showing that fitness comes in ALL SHAPES AND SIZES, and truly is training to live a more full life. It’s not about young and skinny, it’s about showing that fitness can be a part of ANYONE’S life, regardless of age.
**
#MYFIT celebrates clients who challenge themselves physically and mentally to move better, perform better and live better. #thesvptway
**
We are grateful to clients, Glen and Jocelyne, for sharing their #MYFIT story, again, after first sharing it with us in 2018 (yup, they are still with us!):

Glen and Jocelyn are sharing their #MYFIT story through a poem:

ODE TO SVPT

Our Retirement was pending

But the energy was ending

One look in the mirror

Had left us in fear

With bodies obese

And more than 1 crease

We were sick and tired

So..a trainer was hired

We joined SVPT

To create a new me

What a place we found ourselves in

Let the exercise now begin

A start was made and it was slow

We felt embarrassed and on show

Commitment was the #1 key

To the success of this new journey

Improvement did not come with ease

The option to quit was always a tease

But three times a week we went without fail

Three years went by and we did prevail

Four trainers we did outlast

Brittany is the most steadfast

Lifting, flexing, lunging….we began to move

But the weight we simply could not lose

Training alone was not enough

Diet too made the right stuff

 

A full lifestyle shift is what was needed

And with our tenacity it was completed

Together 170 lbs we did drop

Simply because we did not stop

Another look into the mirror

No longer brings that same old fear

 

Italy, Austria, Croatia and more

Off to challenge ourselves galore

A thousand kilometers we did ride

And taller mountains we could stride

Injury, illness, surgery, depression

Tried to derail us but taught us a lesson

 

The motto upon which we relied

And to our success it did provide

That everyday No matter what

It’s really simple;  “JUST SHOW UP

Now we feel our future’s secure

Because we know we can endure

 

Biking Pilgrim’s Trail in Spain awaits

Without guides and carrying our freight

We cannot afford to be lazy

Instead we need to train like crazy

Can’t thank you enough SVPT

In helping dreams become reality

 

Aislinn’s #MYFIT STORY

SVPT is proud to present #MYFIT – a celebration of our clients who live a fit and balanced lifestyle.
**
#MYFIT is not about a 6 pack or a bikini body, it’s about showing that fitness comes in ALL SHAPES AND SIZES, and truly is training to live a more full life. It’s not about young and skinny, it’s about showing that fitness can be a part of ANYONE’S life, regardless of age.
**
#MYFIT celebrates clients who challenge themselves physically and mentally to move better, perform better and live better. #thesvptway
**
We are grateful to client, Aislinn, for sharing her #MYFIT story:

“I’ve really just started my fitness journey. For most of my life, I’ve been somewhat inactive, but I figured we have a finite amount of time on this earth and it would be a shame to die without knowing what my body is capable of. I can’t say I look forward to working out, but I challenge myself to do it anyway to achieve my goals. I want to feel strong—prepared for life’s challenges and capable of handling daily tasks (e.g. carrying Costco groceries, rearranging my furniture, cradling my great dane like a baby, etc.). After each session, I feel more energized (funny how that works) and proud of what I’ve accomplished. It may be relatively small, but it’s a big deal to me.”

It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year?

Hustle and bustle! That’s usually what comes to mind with the holiday season and family obligations, work parties, and other social gatherings. This usually means less free time and lots of (tasty) foods and drinks. Maybe this is what sparks the desire in most people to start up a new exercise program in the New Year as a result of guilty feelings towards a month of poor eating and neglecting your healthy routines. Many gyms thrive on the unrealistic goals of the “resolutionists”, but the best ones remain steady throughout the year because they teach balance and not using shame to make you feel like you need to “exercise away” the holiday weight gain.

The #SVPTway isn’t about shame or guilt surrounding the holidays. True LONG TERM success is about recognizing the ebbs and flows of life and not feeling bad when you have less time to give to your healthy habits. The holidays are a time for maintenance, not for making gains in fitness. But hey, if you are making gains then keep it up. We are just saying that maintenance is AWESOME during this time of year. Just keep moving and get some exercise in where you can. Be attentive to what you’re putting in your body, but life is short (READ: eat the damn cake). While the New Year might inspire you to get back into routine and maybe work a bit harder, remember that getting back into things means that you’re going to need to ease in to avoid a burnout. Remember that setting sustainable goals will help you stick to your new routine. Hiring a certified, qualified trainer can help you learn how to set attainable goals and stay motivated as well as keep you accountable which usually means sticking to the plan for longer.

Tips for December training:
● Try to get in exercise where you can – not only will this help you keep your gains, but also relieve holiday stress, and give you a moment of YOU time
● Don’t be afraid to change it up if travel and time means you can’t do what you normally do – opt for outdoor activities, a new class, etc. – something is better than nothing
● Try to incorporate movement into family activities when you can – get everyone moving

Tips for January training:
● Ease into it – don’t go all out in the beginning
● Create SMART goals that are attainable and sustainable – just because its January 1st, doesn’t mean your life has miraculously changed and all of a sudden you can do more than what you could in 2019
● Stay away from trends and challenges
● Hire a trainer to keep you accountable and teach you how to be independent, after all, you don’t want to be making the SAME goals next year. Next year you should be hitting NEW ones!

BMI: Is it Important?

BMI, or body mass index, is a calculation based on the height and weight of a person that is supposed to be a general measure of overall health and body composition. For many years this was the standard to determine whether a person was within an acceptable weight range for their height to deem them “healthy”, overweight or obese.

Over the past few years, there has been many speaking out against the use of this measure within the health and fitness industry. This is because the calculation does not take into account any factors other than height and weight. It is an inaccurate measure of body fat content and does not take into account factors like muscle mass, bone density, overall body composition, racial and differences between sexes.

Traditionally BMI has been used as a tool to predict the risk of disease and mortality by measuring a correlation between obesity and things like heart disease, stroke, heart failure and diabetes. However, there have been a number of studies that have indicated that some people considered “obese” on the BMI scale, in fact, have a lower cardiovascular risk and an improved metabolic profile compared to some individuals with a “normal BMI” who are more metabolically unhealthy and at a higher risk for disease than their obese counterparts.

It doesn’t take a scientist to understand why BMI might not give an accurate or useful body composition profile. Consider an athlete, someone who competes as either a bodybuilder or something like an MMA fighter. These athletes are not only muscular, but typically quite lean. Not to mention their fitness levels are often well above the average Joe. Someone with this body type who is 5’10” and 190 lbs would have a BMI of 27.3. This BMI would put this individual in the category of overweight, yet no one looking at this athlete would think that could be possible. The calculation wrongly assumes lower muscle mass and high relative fat content.

BMI also does not consider localized body fat, which is potentially more dangerous than overall fat as it relates to body composition. Abdominal fat has been found to have severe health risks including cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance and higher mortality rates. Additionally, thinner people might also have an excess of visceral fat, which is linked to higher risk of disease when compared to lean muscle mass.

Unfortunately, despite its obvious flaws in accurately capturing the overall fat content and health of an individual, BMI is sort of all we have. There are more efficient and accurate methods to measure body fat percentage, but these come with a hefty price tag that is simply not practical for most people. Measuring height and weight is convenient and practical during a quick doctor’s visit. Until there is a better method available, BMI will continue to be used by healthcare professionals, but it should come with a disclaimer that the results should be taken with a grain of salt.

Kristen Hansen, BA, CSEP-CPT, PFT-NAIT, NASM-CES, FRCms
SVPT Fitness & Athletics

Jackie’s #MYFIT STORY


SVPT is proud to present #MYFIT – a celebration of our clients who live a fit and balanced lifestyle.
**
#MYFIT is not about a 6 pack or a bikini body, it’s about showing that fitness comes in ALL SHAPES AND SIZES, and truly is training to live a more full life. It’s not about young and skinny, it’s about showing that fitness can be a part of ANYONE’S life, regardless of age.
**
#MYFIT celebrates clients who challenge themselves physically and mentally to move better, perform better and live better. #thesvptway
**
We are grateful to long time client, Jackie, for sharing her #MYFIT story:
“I have been going to a gym of some sorts since I was old enough to get a membership. And for many years I had my own home gym. While I remained committed to my workout routine, I never really saw results. A minor car accident 9 years ago led to a nagging back injury. Physio and massage helped provide relief in the short term, but I couldn’t get rid of the ache. Regular massage therapy became my crutch. One day I decided I needed to make a big change to the way I was doing things. I became an SVPT client 3 years ago.
SVPT trainer, Cam has taught me how to work out correctly and efficiently. I have surprised myself with how much weight I can now lift, push or carry. The progress I have seen with my endurance and strength has been empowering.
I know now what #MYFIT means to me.
It means focusing on my muscle and strength, not the weight on the scale. And making my back healthy, strong and pain-free.
It means moving freely, easily and without limitation.
It means setting a goal I never imagined I would set, doing something I didn’t think I could do….I completed the Melissa’s Road Race 5K in Banff this past September, setting my own personal best of 31min20sec.
It means not working out alone in a big box gym or in my basement; rather being part of a community of like-minded, supportive and fun people.
And it means turning 50 in a few months feeling the fittest I have ever been.”

Denyse's #MYFIT Story- Edmonton Fitness

Denyse’s #MYFIT STORY

SVPT is proud to present #MYFIT – a celebration of our clients who live a fit and balanced lifestyle.
**
#MYFIT is not about a 6 pack or a bikini body, it’s about showing that fitness comes in ALL SHAPES AND SIZES, and truly is training to live a more full life. It’s not about young and skinny, it’s about showing that fitness can be a part of ANYONE’S life, regardless of age.
**
#MYFIT celebrates clients who challenge themselves physically and mentally to move better, perform better and live better. #thesvptway
**
We are grateful to client, Denyse, for sharing her #MYFIT story:
“#MYFIT has been a journey of overcoming obstacles and redefining the way I think about my body and my identity. After sustaining several injuries from long-distance running, I began to look into alternative ways to maintain an active lifestyle. I soon realized I needed to go beyond “just running” to perform more optimally; a balanced approach of building strength, endurance, and better body mechanics would allow me to pursue the activities I loved and my goals of a healthy body without perennial injury.
There was one problem however- finding an approach for lifting weights wasn’t easy. I was born without much of my left hand in a condition known as symbrachydactyly. I knew how to use resistance machines but wanted to make the progressions that dumbbell and barbell exercises could afford me.
The journey to find prosthetics that could work for me in a way that was pain-free, and most of all safe, is one I’m still on. As in all things, I found being my own advocate, doing the research, and not taking bad solutions for an answer allowed me work through many sub-par prosthetics to find options that work for me. I’ve never let my limb difference define or limit me, but I now have the tools I need to do deadlifts, overhead presses, complex dumbbell movements—all exercises I’d once been unsure if I’d be able to figure out how to do.
Lately, #MYFIT has been about setting goals, achieving them, and showing myself what I’m capable of in the process. Everyone has challenges in pursuing their fitness goals—I encourage everyone to embrace those unique challenges, be brave enough to find solutions, and love themselves throughout the whole experience. You’re worth the time and effort of doing so.”

To Stretch or To Not Stretch?

There are so many questions and confusion when it comes to stretching. Do we do it? If so, how often and when? Will we die if we don’t?

When it comes to stretching, the opinions are divisive. Some say there’s nothing beneficial about stretching before or after exercise, some say it’s actually a risk to stretch before activities, and others swear that you’ll explode if you don’t stretch before jumping into a workout. So, who is right?

There are a few different ways to stretch. That’s right, not all stretching is the same!

Static stretching is what most people think of first. This involves a stretch that is held for a longer period of time, while holding the same (static) position. Another type of stretching is dynamic stretching. This involves using movement and momentum to propel the muscle into an extended range of motion. There is also Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF) stretching. This type of stretching can be used to increase mobility by opening a new range of motion that was not available prior to the stretching. It uses a sequence of contracting and relaxing muscles to basically trick your brain into allowing a greater range of motion.

It seems that there is research to support any argument about stretching, largely because the research is inconclusive at best. There is a consensus that there may be benefits to stretching before exercise, provided that the stretching is not deep, static stretching. There is little evidence to support the idea that not stretching before exercise is detrimental, and you certainly won’t explode. That said, stretching is completely different from warming up before exercise. Stretching is not a warm up, and should not be used as a warm up. Stretching can help prepare the muscles for the stretch they might encounter in the activity you’re about to do, but that won’t prepare your muscles to do the WORK that the exercise demands.

For the average Joe stretching before exercise is neither definitively beneficial nor harmful. More elite athletes, on the other hand, do need to weigh the evidence that there is a temporary reduction in the ability to produce force following a stretching session. This means those in power sports, or sports that do not require a special flexibility or range of motion are better off to skip the pre-game stretch for maximum performance, unless its followed by some type of movement or other explosive type of warm up before heading into practice or game performance.

Stretching post-exercise has largely the same results in terms of studies as pre-exercise stretching. Although there is a marginal increase in reports of less muscle soreness when post-exercise stretching is completed.

It is important to note that the trials that have been completed have centred around static stretching and have not explored other kinds of stretching. It is also important to note that there are no studies that have looked at the chronic effect of stretching, as all have focused on the acute effects of stretching.

So, what does that all mean? More or less, stretch if it makes you feel good, and don’t feel guilty if you don’t. At the very least, getting your stretch on won’t hurt!

Kristen Hansen, BA, CSEP-CPT, PFT-NAIT, NASM-CES, FRCms
SVPT Fitness & Athletics

Trevor’s #MYFIT Story

SVPT is proud to present #MYFIT – a celebration of our clients who live a fit and balanced lifestyle.
**
#MYFIT is not about a 6 pack or a bikini body, it’s about showing that fitness comes in ALL SHAPES AND SIZES, and truly is training to live a more full life. It’s not about young and skinny, it’s about showing that fitness can be a part of ANYONE’S life, regardless of age.
**
#MYFIT celebrates clients who challenge themselves physically and mentally to move better, perform better and live better. #thesvptway
**
We are grateful to SVPT Trainer, Trevor, for sharing his #MYFIT story:

“I’ve always been very active person and in the past exercise was all about short term success. I played high level fastball and wanted to be in shape and at my best for the sport, I would constantly ignore injuries because I wanted to be on the field competing regardless of what my body was telling me. I used to only do workouts for aesthetic purposes instead of working on what would actually benefit me because I felt pressure to look a certain way. I would go to the gym to be social because it was the cool thing to do, not because I was serious about improving my quality of life. I was very short sighted about why exercise was a part of my life, but as time went on that shifted.

#MYFIT now is about thinking long term and seeing exercise as part of the bigger picture. I stay active now so that when I’m older nothing holds me back from living my life. I want to be able to stay active with my wife and not be limited to what we can see and do as we grow old together. I want to be able to play sports with my future children the way I am able to play hockey with my Dad (10 years and counting). I want to be like my Grandma at 85 years old still curling and golfing and being active in the community because she has committed to being fit and healthy her whole life. #MYFIT now is about staying mentally and physically healthy so that as the years go by I can live a life full of health and happiness with nothing holding me back!”